Brain injury & hypoxia

Stem cells from cord blood and bone marrow are being investigated as possible treatments for brain injury and cerebral hypoxia. Click on the link provided to find out more about each trial. It remains too early to know which approach will be most suitable. We need evidence collected in clinical trials to determine if a proposed stem cell treatment is both safe and effective.

tagged as Brain injury & hypoxia

  • Treatment of Severe Adult Traumatic Brain Injury Using Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Location: US
    Overview: This clinical trial is being conducted by the University of Texas in Houston. The aim of this trial is to determine the effect of the patient’s own bone marrow on limiting the extent of the resultant neurological impairment following severe traumatic brain injury. The study seeks to enrol 20 participants within 24 hours of their brain injury. Participants will have a Coma Score of between 5 and 6. The first five participants will receive only the conventional treatment for severe brain injury. The second five will be given cells taken from their bone marrow (via IV). The next two groups of five patients will each receive a progressively increasing dose of the bone marrow cells - to determine if the number of bone marrow cells infused has a role. Participants will be assessed for complications and any change in their Coma Score or other disability ratings. The trial is expected to be completed by June 2014.
    Link to Clinical Registry
    Trial Design: Safety and Efficacy Study
    Status: Open - Recruiting
    Stem Cell: Adult Bone Marrow Stem Cells
  • Autologous Cord Blood Cells for Brain Injury in Term Newborns Location: Singapore
    Overview: This study aims to investigate the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of collecting and infusing a baby's own umbilical cord blood after brain injury. The trial is being conducted by the National University Hospital in Singapore and the National Medical Research Council (NMRC). The trial expects to enrol 10, full-term infants that have developed hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy during and shortly after birth. The umbilical cord blood of all infants born at the participating institutions will be kept fresh (refrigerated but not frozen) for three days after birth. In that time any infant showing evidence of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy will be given an intravenous infusion of its own umbilical cord blood. The children will be monitored for complications and changes in their clinical condition. The trial commenced in September 2011 and is expected to run until September 2015.
    Link to Clinical Registry
    Trial Design: Safety and Efficacy Study
    Status: Open - Recruiting
    Stem Cell: Umbilical Cord Stem Cells
  • Autologous Stem Cells in Newborns With Oxygen Deprivation Location: Mexico
    Overview: This trial is being conducted at Hospital Universario in Monterrey to investigate the effect of cord blood on newborn infants who have suffered from oxygen deprivation (perinatal asphyxiation). The aim of the study is to determine if cord blood can prevent or limit the extent of damage when given within 48 hours of injury. The cells are delivered intravenously (IV) and they expect to enrol 20 participants. The neurological development of these infants will be monitored over one year and compared with that of the group of infants who did not receive treatment.
    Link to Clinical Registry
    Trial Design: Safety and Efficacy Study
    Status: Open - Recruiting
    Stem Cell: Umbilical Cord Stem Cells