News

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  • Melissa Little and David Gardner elected as Fellows of Australian Academy of Science
    22 May 2017
    Twenty-one of Australia’s best scientists have been elected to the Australian Academy of Science, a rare and esteemed honour, for their outstanding contributions to science. Amongst the 2017 Fellows are Professor Melissa Little, Stem Cells Australia’s Program Leader and Theme Director of Cell Biology at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, and Professor David Gardner, reproductive biologist at the University of Melbourne and a Chief Investigator in our consortium.
  • Finding the back gate to schizophrenia
    15 May 2017
    Monash researcher Associate Professor Bourne has been awarded a prestigious grant to study how cognitive function is controlled in the brain and how these mechanisms may influence the development of schizophrenia.
  • Scientists discover new type of brain cell
    10 May 2017
    Australian and Japanese researchers have discovered a new type of brain cell by studying tropical freshwater zebrafish. These cells, which act as ‘scavengers’ in the brain mopping up potentially damaging cellular waste, are also found in humans and may provide protection against neurological diseases.
  • New online tool to accelerate development of new treatments for leukaemia
    10 May 2017
    Finding a more effective treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) has been aided by the development of a new virtual platform, LEUKomics. Launched by scientists at the University of Glasgow and the University of Melbourne, this new resource has been designed to allow researchers to more easily understand what is happening to CML patients’ white blood cells and is free for them to use and share.
  • Stem Cells Australia 2016 Annual Report now available
    24 April 2017
    During 2016 SCA’s research teams continued to expand their outstanding record of contributions to both basic and applied stem cell biology, including a remarkably diverse publications portfolio which included over 150 publications, a major collaborative initiative formed with Bioplatforms Australia and significant recognitions and honours from prestigious societies, to name a few. Click here to download our latest Annual Report.
  • Examining the dynamics that drive and sustain stem cell tourism
    20 April 2017
    A new book addressing the complex forces that shape and perpetuate a market for commercial stem cell treatments was launched at the Kathleen Syme Library in Carlton on 18 April. Entitled, Stem Cell Tourism and the Political Economy of Hope, and published by Palgrave MacMillan the book is a culmination of seven years of work undertaken by a team of interdisciplinary researchers from the University of Melbourne and Monash University.
  • New study doubles estimate of functional genes in our genome
    06 March 2017
    A group of researchers from Japan and Australia have completed a landmark study where they revealed that long non-coding RNAs, a poorly understood and highly controversial class of genes, may link with major diseases, including inflammation and cancer.
  • Start-up makes quick work of cellular experiments
    03 February 2017
    Start-up company Scaled Biolabs Inc is changing the way researchers around the world conduct manual cellular experiments and accelerating discoveries in biology by providing novel devices that enable 1000’s of experiments to occur simultaneously.
  • Alternate facts and Australian stem cell research
    02 February 2017
    In The Australian of 30 January, Angela Shanahan did her part to welcome in the Trump era with a tirade replete with a bizarre collection of “alternate facts” regarding stem cell research. The piece was ostensibly a reply to media criticism of the public relations campaign in support of the award of Australian of the Year to stem cell researcher Alan Mackay-Sim. However, Shanahan’s article swiftly morphed into an incompetent rehash of tired old arguments concerning the use of human embryos in stem cell research. The suppositions and conclusions in the article are at best ill-informed and out of date, and at worst complete misrepresentations of reality. They invite refutation.
  • New leadership appointments to Stem Cells Australia initiative
    30 January 2017
    Professor Melissa Little has been named the new head of the Stem Cells Australia initiative. Professor Little is based at the Department of Pediatrics, University of Melbourne and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute and brings a wealth of experience to the role, with a strong vision for the future of Australian science in this important area of medical research. Professor Christine Wells, Director of the University of Melbourne’s Centre for Stem Cell Systems will be joining Professor Little as Deputy Program Leader of Stem Cells Australia.
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